Saturday, December 10, 2005

Those Other Holidays (C-15)

I'll be one of the first to admit that I might not be the most qualified to really teach about Hannukha or Kwanzaa, but I am the only one I know doing it in China. And while I was born, bred, and baptized Roman Catholic (every sperm is sacred...) it doesn't mean I'm blind to other traditions. Of course, I'm American, which means I was lucky enough to have been raised with open eyes. Now, for some reason, I'm knee-deep in Chinese who barely understand the faith which is supposedly my own and I find myself compelled to teach about those which are not. Again, this is probably because I'm American.

So this week I've done two lessons, both in my advanced classes, revolving around these two celebrations. My info comes straight from the World Book Encylcopedia with a little (again, little) personal experience thrown in (eg: I am aware that Hannukha is not the highest of Jewish holidays, and I do make sure to communicate that to my students). It works out nicely because the two have many similar aspects that my brightest kids immediately link. I feeled justified because their eyes are opening to something outside of either China or Hollywood. Plus I know that somewhere Jon Lovitz is smiling.

However, if you havent sumised yourself, I still know next to nothing about Kwanzaa. But I am trying. It makes more sense than Boxing Day, I'll tell you that much.

So put on your yamulke, and drink your gin-and-tonic-a, and have a happy happy happy happy Hannukha. And Kwanzaa!

2 Comments:

At 8:14 PM, Blogger eirishis said...

All I really know is that each day has a theme. December 28th is Collective Work and Responsibility. December 29th is Cooperative Economics. And New Years Eve is Creativity. Of course, they all have weird Swahili names.

Needless to say, I love the holiday. I used to send Kwanzaa cards to friends...until I realized that probably wasn't cool

 
At 10:26 PM, Blogger Canadian said...

No Bill,being an American means YOU
THINK your eyes are open.There is a difference.

 

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